Monday, February 14, 2011

Life Links 2/14/11

The High Court in the UK has rejected a bid by abortion providers to reinterpret abortion law to let women to get all the abortion pills on their visit to the clinic and take the second group of pills at home. Abortion provider BPAS plans on working to change the law. In the U.S., abortion clinics routinely give women the second drug in an RU-486 abortion to administer at home in opposition to the FDA guidelines.
The British Pregnancy Advisory Service (Bpas) has failed in a high court bid to secure a new interpretation of UK law. Its lawyers argued that wording relating to the prescription and administration in a clinic of drugs needed to bring about a medical abortion – two pills, taken 24-48 hours apart – could be defined as the prescription and issuing of the medication, allowing women to go home after the first visit.

Bpas says that the second visit can be a hardship for women living some distance away, and that some are afraid they will miscarry on their way home.

Handing down judgment, the court ruled that this interpretation of the law was not possible. But the judge effectively put the onus back with the government, ruling that the 1967 Abortion Act, as amended in 1990, enables the secretary of state to react to "changes in medical science" as it gives the health minister "the power to approve a wider range of place, including potentially the home, and the conditions on which such approval may be given relating to the particular medicine and the manner of its administration or use".

The North Carolina Court of Appeals will have to decide if Robert Broom can be charged with killing his daughter Lily. Robert shot and held his pregnant wife Danna captive for 12 hours when she was 26 weeks pregnant. Lily was delivered prematurely because of Danna's injuries and died 31 days after being born.
Danna Broom knows she lived because of Lily. At 26 weeks, Lily had grown big enough to push her mother's organs into different places. As a result, the bullet missed her most vital parts.

But, more than that, it was Lily's kicks and tumbles that she said urged her to survive during the 12 hours her husband held her captive.

"Lily is a hero," Danna Broom said through tears. "I'm here because of her. I want her sacrifice to matter."


North Carolina, unlike more than 35 other states, doesn't treat fetuses as murder victims. In many of those states, it doesn't matter how advanced the pregnancy or the baby's chance of surviving outside of the mother when she is born. If North Carolina had such a law, Broom's case would be simple: Lily would be a victim in her own right.

The California Stem Cell Report reports on a new study which shows that only 18% of California Institute of Regenerative Medicine's grant went to projects which were "clearly" not eligible for federal funding. Remember that CIRM was sold to California taxpayers on the idea that this $3 billion in funding was needed to cure diseases and fill the supposed hole left by President Bush's embryonic stem cell funding policy.

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