Thursday, February 03, 2011

Life Links 1/3/11

Watch Mollie Zeigler Hewingway talk to Amanda Marcotte on about abortion. It's almost unbelievable how ignorant Marcotte is. Her views on Live Action's videos are just off the wall. She thinks the Live Action people posing as young girls looking for abortions or posing as a pimp act "ridiculous" when they're at the Planned Parenthood clinics and that all the Planned Parenthood clinics realized the prolifers were acting (maybe should have waited til the videos came out to comment).

Amanda also acts like "door widths" are a stupid requirement for abortion clinics, apparently unaware that emergency workers had a larger amount of difficulty removing Karnamaya Mongar (who eventually died after getting an abortion from Gosnell) because the size of doors at Gosnell's clinic. I think the most telling part of the move comes at around 12:00 when Mollie asks Amanda if Down Syndrome counts as a valid reason why a woman would "need" a post-24 week abortion. Amanda stumbles around for minutes with numerous "you knows," "likes," and "ummms."

Not Dead Yet's blog discusses how a recent pro-assisted suicide documentary won a prestigious film award.
So, it's not a shocker that a bunch of folks in the film trade would go head over heels for a documentary that sounds an awful lot like a PSA for legalization of assisted suicide. In other words, the award probably tells us more about the judges granting the award than it does about the film itself. I doubt I'd lose any money if I bet that the judges were predisposed to approve of legalized assisted suicide, and when the film preached at them, they didn't recognize it as a sermon.

Viginia Governor Bob McDonnell has proposed a budget amendment which would ban taxpayer funding of embryonic stem cell research.

Researchers have found that induced pluripotent stem cells retain "memory" of their past.
In a side-by-side comparison of these induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells, researchers from the Salk Institute in San Diego found a consistent pattern of reprogramming errors — places where the iPS cells did not revert completely to an embryonic state.....

In some ways the iPS cells were different from one another, suggesting the reprogramming process itself might contribute to aberrations, he added.

That does not mean iPS cells can't be used in medicine, experts said. Improvements in technology could one day erase their epigenetic memory.

No comments:

Post a Comment