Tuesday, June 03, 2008

Life Links 6/3/08

It appears an experimental adult stem cell transplant to treat a boy suffering from a painful genetic skin disease called recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa was successful.
The boy's doctors said Monday they think they have found a cure for the painful disease that, though rare, causes the skin to fall off at the slightest touch and inevitably leads to cancer. Most children who have it do not survive to adulthood.

"Maybe we can take one more disorder off the incurable list," said Dr. John Wagner, a bone marrow specialist and stem cell researcher at the university. He agreed to treat Nate Liao after his mother begged Wagner to try using stem cells as therapy.

"It's not often that it feels like you hit a home run in medical research, but this one feels like it," Wagner said.

Dennis Boyles explains the problems Phill Kline has had in enforcing Kansas' prolife laws.
The former state attorney general and current district attorney of Johnson County, in suburban Kansas City, Kline is that most unfortunate of political creatures — the inspired reformer. The object of his quixotic campaign is to reform the abortion laws of Kansas — not by changing them, but by simply enforcing them.

In a place like Kansas, you might think, that’s T-ball politics — but that would only be in the Kansas of popular (and Thomas Frank’s) imagination, where wily conservatives are winning the culture wars. They’re definitely not, as Kline now knows well. He started his mission after being elected attorney general in 2002. After six years, he has been so badly mangled by Kansas’s political machinery that he’s the one under siege.

That’s his punishment for conducting a string of long and fruitful investigations that appear to show that the state’s largest abortion providers — including Johnson County’s Planned Parenthood clinic and George Tiller’s infamous late-term-abortion clinic in Wichita — have not only performed illegal abortions, they’ve also falsified documents as part of a cover-up.
In other Kansas abortion news, it took more than a year for Governor Kathleen Sebelius' office to seek reimbursement from the pro-choice organization who auctioned off the party at the governor's mansion won by abortionist George Tiller.

Parents in England who naturally conceived quadruplets have chosen against selective reduction.
The couple, who met when they were teenagers and have been married for four years, were offered a selective reduction, which would mean removing one or more of the foetuses to increase the chances of the others surviving - but are determined to let nature take its course.

They been told the pregnancy carries a high risk of complications, but so far all four babies are developing well.

'Both of us are against abortion,' said Mr Wing. 'We decided to take the risk.

'We wanted a girl so how would we feel if we had selective reduction and found out that the ones we selected were girls?

'Anyway, we didn't want to say, "Right, you can live and you can die". It was horrible even when the consultant was talking to us about it.'

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